Date:
13 Feb 2023,
5.00PM – 8.00PM
duration:
3 hrs
Venue:
John Britten Building, University of Canterbury
Address:
69 Creyke Road
Christchurch
Cost:
Free event
Register Add to Calendar 2023-02-13 17:00:00 2023-02-13 20:00:00 Pacific/Auckland PhD Showcase Evening

During this seminar, each of the speakers will present briefly on their PhD, their discoveries and their motivations. The session will allow for networking before and after the presentations to connect with like-minded individuals and discuss topics of interest.

Danyon Stitt
Sports-induced brain injury has become a high-profile issue that affects all who participate in contact, combat, and collision sports. Studies have linked repeated head impact exposure to learning difficulties during adolescence, structural changes in the brain, and the development of neurological conditions such as early-onset Alzheimers. Rugby, one of the most popular sports in NZ, is one such sport of concern.

Danyon’s PhD work aims to understand the biomechanics and means of reducing brain injury in rugby players. Therefore, his presentation will discuss the current understanding of sport-induced brain injury, how we measure and determine dangerous head impacts, and the methods used to test and assess the performance of rugby headgear. Danyon will also discuss our studies of headgear performance, the novel methods we have implemented, and how we are aiming to improve current headgear testing standards.

Thomas Wallace
Thomas’ research is investigating how the management of stopbank-dam systems influences flooding outcomes. The research aims to encourage managing these structures with a broader system-wide view in mind. Focus is being given to deepening the understanding of their operational and physical vulnerabilities. This will contribute to contributing to building New Zealand's resilience to flood disasters. The phases of research are focused on the following:

•             Developing the understanding of operational maturity in our stopbank-dam systems so that risk-reducing activities may be more effectively prioritized. 

•             Undertaking probabilistic stopbank breach flood modeling to determine the exposure of communities and infrastructure to flooding

•             Developing alternative operational strategies and high-level recommendations to reduce the exposure of communities and infrastructure

A systematic approach to catchment management will improve resilience and reduce risk in our flood-exposed communities.

Tom Francis
Base isolation is an incredibly effective technology for reducing damage and protecting building contents during an earthquake. However, base isolation devices are expensive meaning they are currently only used for large and important structures. Tom’s research focused on the development and testing of a low-cost base isolation system that fits seamlessly with the current construction approach for New Zealand residential buildings, with the aim of making the technology more affordable for all.

Rosie Pagel
Tsunami have devastated low-lying countries and communities internationally and will continue to wreak havoc as long as seaside communities exist. Low-lying countries such as Indonesia and Japan are seen as vulnerable as major tsunami have hit these countries in recent years. However, many other countries, including New Zealand, are at risk of a significant tsunami hitting the coastline.

Previous events have highlighted that bridges are particularly vulnerable to tsunami, as these waves create large uplift forces on the bridge deck and standard design practices do not account for this force. Rosie’s research aims to address this vulnerability, by developing resilient solutions for tsunami-prone bridges that can be adopted into industry practice.

John Britten Building, University of Canterbury Engineering New Zealand hello@engineeringnz.org

The Canterbury Branch are pleased to present a PhD Showcase, highlighting the wonderful research students and their projects at the University of Canterbury.

During this seminar, each of the speakers will present briefly on their PhD, their discoveries and their motivations. The session will allow for networking before and after the presentations to connect with like-minded individuals and discuss topics of interest.

Danyon Stitt
Sports-induced brain injury has become a high-profile issue that affects all who participate in contact, combat, and collision sports. Studies have linked repeated head impact exposure to learning difficulties during adolescence, structural changes in the brain, and the development of neurological conditions such as early-onset Alzheimers. Rugby, one of the most popular sports in NZ, is one such sport of concern.

Danyon’s PhD work aims to understand the biomechanics and means of reducing brain injury in rugby players. Therefore, his presentation will discuss the current understanding of sport-induced brain injury, how we measure and determine dangerous head impacts, and the methods used to test and assess the performance of rugby headgear. Danyon will also discuss our studies of headgear performance, the novel methods we have implemented, and how we are aiming to improve current headgear testing standards.

Thomas Wallace
Thomas’ research is investigating how the management of stopbank-dam systems influences flooding outcomes. The research aims to encourage managing these structures with a broader system-wide view in mind. Focus is being given to deepening the understanding of their operational and physical vulnerabilities. This will contribute to contributing to building New Zealand's resilience to flood disasters. The phases of research are focused on the following:

•             Developing the understanding of operational maturity in our stopbank-dam systems so that risk-reducing activities may be more effectively prioritized. 

•             Undertaking probabilistic stopbank breach flood modeling to determine the exposure of communities and infrastructure to flooding

•             Developing alternative operational strategies and high-level recommendations to reduce the exposure of communities and infrastructure

A systematic approach to catchment management will improve resilience and reduce risk in our flood-exposed communities.

Tom Francis
Base isolation is an incredibly effective technology for reducing damage and protecting building contents during an earthquake. However, base isolation devices are expensive meaning they are currently only used for large and important structures. Tom’s research focused on the development and testing of a low-cost base isolation system that fits seamlessly with the current construction approach for New Zealand residential buildings, with the aim of making the technology more affordable for all.

Rosie Pagel
Tsunami have devastated low-lying countries and communities internationally and will continue to wreak havoc as long as seaside communities exist. Low-lying countries such as Indonesia and Japan are seen as vulnerable as major tsunami have hit these countries in recent years. However, many other countries, including New Zealand, are at risk of a significant tsunami hitting the coastline.

Previous events have highlighted that bridges are particularly vulnerable to tsunami, as these waves create large uplift forces on the bridge deck and standard design practices do not account for this force. Rosie’s research aims to address this vulnerability, by developing resilient solutions for tsunami-prone bridges that can be adopted into industry practice.

Presenters

Canterbury Branch