Date:
21 Sep 2021,
5.00PM – 6.00PM
duration:
1 hr
Location:
Online
Cost:
Free event
Register Add to Calendar 2021-09-21 17:00:00 2021-09-21 18:00:00 Pacific/Auckland [NEWZ7-001] Join the New Zealand Coastal Society (NZCS) to get an insight with industry professionals and find out more about the memberships on offer. The webinar will consist of 4 presenters who will share their knowledge and experience in coastal engineering and take part in a open Q&A panel session at the end. Online Engineering New Zealand hello@engineeringnz.org

Join the New Zealand Coastal Society (NZCS) to get an insight with industry professionals and find out more about the memberships on offer. The webinar will consist of 4 presenters who will share their knowledge and experience in coastal engineering and take part in a open Q&A panel session at the end.

Emily Tidey
Exploring with a hydrographer
Emily will share some of the adventures she’s had while working as a hydrographic surveyor*; from study at Otago to working on projects around the world doing things like measuring tides, making charts for safety of navigation, mapping wrecks and surveying areas to understand marine habitats, positioning and monitoring underwater oil and gas installations, pipelines and cables, collecting data for tsunami modelling, offshore windfarm and bridge construction.

*Hydrographers work to understand what lies beneath, as well as within, our oceans, lakes and rivers. Hydrographic surveyors make measurements of things such as the depth, tide and position of features to help to create nautical charts (which make sure ships get around the world safely), habitat maps for underwater areas, studies of coastal environments to understand erosion, deposition or potential tsunami effects, measurements for the construction and monitoring of wharves, bridges and dams, underwater resource identification, protection, extraction and recovery, or even to study history by finding old shipwrecks and submerged artefacts. We still don’t know much about what’s under our seas (it’s widely quoted that we know more about the surface of the moon!), so there’s a lot of work for hydrographers out there on “Planet Ocean”!

Steve Raynor
Willy Wonka's Golden Ticket
An engineer with a pulse is the world's most valuable resource. I am pleased to be one of these (with a pulse) and have enjoyed engineering within different cultures around the world. It can be a demanding career but at the same time pretty amazing.
Through engineering in hot Arabian deserts, steaming jungles of Papua New Guinea, underground in Singapore and even civil unrest I have observed three elements that underpin a fun engineering career and will share these and a few stories that will hopefully inspire an exciting future career.
I am Director of Research at Rcon Pacific and a PhD candidate at University of Waikato.

Ryan Abrey
A Choice Swiss Army Knife
Ryan is a Civil and Coastal Engineer for Stantec based in Wellington. He works on marine pipelines as well as coastal protection projects along with helping out delivery of projects for Wellington Water.
I will be discussing the niche in which Coastal Engineering fits into wider multi-disciplinary engineering projects, such as desalination systems and coastal cycle paths.

Craig Davis
A Trip to the Beach
Craig Davis is a Chartered Coastal and Structural Engineer and Director of a consultancy specialising in Coastal Engineering and Planning for the last 20 years. Over this period of time he has worked extensively on coastal process and hazard assessment, and in the real world of coastal structures and shoreline management. His particular interests  are interacting with coastal communities and working through innovative solutions that can achieve a sensible harmony between protecting the coastal character, ecosystems and the use of our coastline and protection of coastal assets